Gender Inequality: Discussion with Dr. Mangala Subramaniam

STTI Chapter at Purdue University, October 4, 2015. 

With a focus on gender inequality this week, the Purdue Chapter of STTI delved into the statistics of gender inequality in Indian society to understand the extent of the issue.

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20151108190645This was followed up with an interaction with Dr. Mangala Subramaniam, Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology, Purdue University.

Some of the questions explored during the discussion:
Why is there more violence in joint families?
Why are the laws that are made on sexual abuse not implemented/enforced in a strong manner?
How is the power distribution affecting the physical and mental abuse of women in families?

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The issue of violence on women is a complex one, and for many of us who come from the urban, modern, “shining” India, it is easy to overlook the extent of the problem. Thus, it was invaluable to have Dr.Subramaniam’s deep insights on the matter.

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Powering India: Energy subsidies and their consequences

Based on a recent group discussion, the STTI Chapter at Purdue explored the issue of fuel subsidies in India, and its long-term systemic consequences.

Energy subsidies have wide-ranging economic consequences. While aimed at protecting consumers, subsidies aggravate fiscal imbalances, crowd-out priority public spending, and depress private investment, including in the energy sector. Subsidies also distort resource allocation by encouraging excessive energy consumption, artificially promoting capital-intensive industries, reducing incentives for investment in renewable energy, and accelerating the depletion of natural resources. Most subsidy benefits are captured by higher-income households, reinforcing inequality. Even future generations are affected through the damaging effects of increased energy consumption on global warming.

Energy-subsidies in India
The long-term effects of fuel subsidies in India are graver than we realise.